Entries by Gwen Ashley Walters

Tomatillos

Tomatillos are sometimes called Mexican green tomatoes, even though they aren’t really tomatoes at all. They are in the same nightshade family as tomatoes, and gooseberries for that matter, hence the papery covering that must be removed before using. They’re sticky, too, after removing the paper husk, but the sticky stuff washes off with cold […]

Spicy Apple Chutney

I adapted this recipe from the Apple Pear Habañero Chutney in my book Par Fork! The Golf Resort Cookbook. I call for a green apple (Granny Smith) and a red apple. You can use any red apple variety, other than Red Delicious, which is mealy and unfortunately bred to look perfect at the sake of […]

Grapefruit Bounty

Grapefruit is available year round, thanks to staggered growing seasons among the handful of states that produce it: California, Arizona, Texas, and Florida. Peak season is October through March. I’ve always thought that the pink and red varieties were sweeter than the pale-fleshed ones, but apparently it isn’t true. Ripeness is one of the factors […]

Baked Acorn Squash

Here’s an easy, how-to-bake acorn squash recipe. Totally a wild guess, but I think the acorn nut shape of this squash has something to do with the name. It comes in all the fall colors (green, burnt orange, yellow) but the most common variety is dark green. It weighs anywhere from 3/4’s of a pound […]

“Real Deal Margaritas”

I always like the name “real deal.” Maybe it’s because I’m a Texan by birth, and it’s a term that means something. The first recipe that jumped out at me in Dotty Griffith’s book, The Contemporary Cowboy Cookbook, was this margarita recipe. I’ve met Dotty, and I think she’s the real deal, too. Not everyone […]

Chef Gwen explores Provence…

After flying to Marseille from London, we take a high speed train to Avignon and a taxi across the Rhône river to the tiny village of Villeneuve-lés-Avignon. We want to be close enough to explore the vibrant Provencal city of Avignon, but not stay in the fray. The little village across the river is quaint, […]

Spice Grinder

Buy an extra coffee grinder (about 20 bucks) to use exclusively for grinding spices.  Then buy whole seeds like coriander, cumin, allspice, etc. Toasting the seeds in a dry skillet for a few minutes will bring out the best in the seeds.  Grind them after toasting and you will definitely notice the difference in the […]